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region of women's rights, minority rights and minorityghts rights. >> but we speak about jerry brown. do you expect him to seek reelection? special in pennsylvania -- pennsylvania has a long tradition. >> i think both california and pennsylvania are great opportunities for us. governor brown is doing an extraordinary job. he is making tough fiscal decisions. i was impressed that he was able to win the referendum that gave voters the choice you either pay higher income taxes for the wealthy or you continue to cut school budget and opportunities to create a work force that is strange for 21st century jobs. he won that referendum. california voters voted for higher taxes on the wealthy. he does intend to work again. i was honored that he nominated me last week to leave the chair of the democratic governors association. we expect him to win when he runs. in pennsylvania, another example of a tea party gov. hugh is not getting results. -- who is not getting results. there are lots of very excited democrat who are not admitting they are running get. we will have an active field of candidates t
that jerry brown is going to run for re-election. he's one of the three governors that served as the youngest governor of their state and the oldest governor of their state. if he's in office in 2014 maybe we'll see a clinton/brown rematch. >> what did you learn today? >> that the democrats are not so optimistic about new jersey. they are optimistic about virginia it seems. but sandy seemed to be a good thing for chris christie. >> and also politics in virginia leading up to the attorney general who the governor may run as an independent. >> the attorney general who traditionally waits his turn, moves up to luents governor and then moves up to governor, a guy who is a big dialing of the conservative fan base and the republican party in virginia. the luents governor is set up to run for governor four years ago then had to wait another attorney general. he is not happy about this. he is -- according to "the washington examiner" he is thinking about running as an independent. the committee chairman, the clirn fundraiser would be the governor of virginia. if you would have told me that five years
it -- it should not be included in your credit score. i think the chair of the subcommittee, senator brown for cosponsoring that. i want to ask about your sense of this. i want to enter several things into the record. i would like the letter that was sent to richard cory, his response back to us, the support letter from a broad coalition including the national home builders association, the medical association, consumers union and two articles from the ap and the new york times. if i could enter those things into the record, i would appreciate it. i wanted to get your perspectives on this. in your recent report you cite research showing 40% of credit disputes are related to collections, events. before we jump into that piece of it, over all, this issue of the complexity of medical that and resolving it, whether it is a good predictor or whether it should be part of the credit reporting system. >> i appreciate your bringing this issue up. it is definitely a source of concern. the fact that collections items are disputed at high rates is not a surprise. -information's its disputed more often
. governor brown is as committed a governor as we have in the country to this project. we also have a very committed assembly in california that had to take a vote to sell the bonds. both the house and senate voted for this project. you all know they represent the people in california. at the very top leadership in california, we have the people supporting this. we need to support it. we also have several companies talking with the governor and his staff and the high speed rail authority about investing in california. we know that this project cannot or will not be built with total federal dollars. we do not have enough money to do that. we need private investment. >> it appears that there is a commitment. the have already committed 39% of the $10 billion which should be sufficient from a federal standpoint for this first leg. the first leg is sorted the easy part of it. it does not serve metropolitan areas. in the expensive and more difficult part is down the road. that will take a commitment from future congresses and future state legislatures. it will not be fully completed high speed r
makers like governor brown who's sitting in the room here, spoiler alert, and what is his position on this, i would be more than happy to hear. so how do we get people to be -- to change their behavior? and, secondarily, how we make this fun because this is such an intense topic, when you walk out of here and all you wanna do is -- >> drink. okay, so -- >> drink. [laughter] >> well, we can work -- we have some wine outside afterwards. a quick question. we got a few minutes left, so consumption -- >> yeah, consumption. well, that -- again, the carbon price will help with that, to make things -- but and that is an education thing. we need to get our children and grandchildren and the public to appreciate nature and things, not just more things. but that's a -- that's part of the problem, so -- and putting a price on it will help a bit. >> welcome to climate one. yes, we're getting toward the end. thank you. >> it's an honest pleasure to be here with you. and before i came up, i was gonna ask you what's it like being around your christmas or thanksgiving table, talking among your fami
their consumption, and how do we get policy makers like governor brown who's sitting in the room here, spoiler alert, and what is his position on this, i would be more than happy to hear. so how do we get people to be -- to change their behavior? and, secondarily, how we make this fun because this is such an intense topic, when you walk out of here and all you wanna do is -- >> drink. okay, so -- >> drink. [laughter] >> well, we can work -- we have some wine outside afterwards. a quick question. we got a few minutes left, so consumption -- >> yeah, consumption. well, that -- again, the carbon price will help with that, to make things -- but and that is an education thing. we need to get our children and grandchildren and the public to appreciate nature and things, not just more things. but that's a -- that's part of the problem, so -- and putting a price on it will help a bit. >> welcome to climate one. yes, we're getting toward the end. thank you. >> it's an honest pleasure to be here with you. and before i came up, i was gonna ask you what's it like being around your christmas or thanksgiving tabl
believe, that we are one family in this great country of ours. we are black and white, we are brown, we are republicans and democrats. we are conservatives and liberals. we are gays and straights. we are from every part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set for
:00 eastern time. listen in the baltimore area. for online c-span.org. >> brown university held the discussion about polls were saying before and after the 2012 presidential election. the associate research director explained. he also talked about the future of presidential polling. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone i and the professor of public policy and director here at brown university. i am happy to welcome you to another installment of the speaker series. the luncheon speaker series is one of the of any event. it attempts to inform brown and a larger community about important matters related to government, politics, and public policy. over the years the speaker series has been a wonderful opportunity for the undergraduate students and masters did it a public policy to connect with of foreign- policy thinkers. we're just pleased this afternoon to welcome the associate director for research of the ku research center. michael has co-authored a number of the pure research center landmark thoughts including in- that of political -- political and social values. next month michael wi
of florence johnson brown, she could not read or write, but she was a good woman with a big heart and a stronger will. she took jerome and she said she could not imagine all the abuse he had been through. it just sounded too unbelievable. but she looked him in the eye and said, don't let your abuse be your excuse. she said someday you could be a great juvenile judge or case worker, something special. but there was a lot of rebellion and anger in the young man. he hated lots of people and things, and especially god. ms. brown would not heed jerome's fleas to leave -- pleas to leave him alone. she kept praying for him every single day by name. she said she knew there was good in him but prayed that god would not let him end up in jail or prison because she knew god could do something very special with him. he tried the praying thing himself but he was cynical. he wanted to go to college, he wanted to be a coach, but he knew no one who had money. but then he found out he could run really fast and play football really well. though his teacher told him he was too black and too stupid t
? >> i think it is clear, yes we should build on brown field land. yes, we should try to deal with the problem of empty homes. we do need to have a frank conversation about the need to build more flats and more houses so we don't have the current situation that we have, so if people don't have the help of mom and dad people in their mid 30's needing help to buy their first house. i think there is a wide decree of agreement on what a new system should look like. it is set out there in black and white, we need to challenge the press to introduce it and if they don't we need to take further action. >> with more men in work than ever before, and with more women in work than ever before, an an tri rate, does my friend not agree with me that the opposition's plan b would jeopardize all of those achievements? >> my friend is entirely right. we are making progress. of course, it is tough when there are so many economic headwinds against us. a records numb of businesses starting up last year. we're on the right track and plan b stand for bankruptcy, that is what labor would give us. >>
. congressman bud brown and joyce brown and his father, clarence brown, who also served in the united states congress. the list gos on and on. the -- to follow these great leaders, to have the opportunity to serve behind my mentors, has been a great honor. you know, i often will walk, when i'm here in washington, walk through the halls of the capitol at night when there's very few people around. i can tell you the history, the tradition, the integrity of this capitol is still there. and it speaks to you at night. often as i walk through the halls of the capitol or traveling throughout the district, folks will come up to me and remind me that when one door closes, another opens. and that god has a plan for all of us. as i begin the next chapter of my life with my wife of 26 years, eileen, and our three boys, brian, kevin and eric, i want to take this great experience, the knowledge, the memories from here in congress with me in the future. and i always will remember the advice my father gave to me when i first ran for my first office nearly 25 years ago, local precinct, county central committ
. it is a great product. tina brown is one of the legends of the industry right now and if anybody can figure out how to do this transition from the print advertising model to a tablet, internet, online model, it is going to be tina brown. she has had one of the greatest careers you can ask for in journalism and i trust her leadership as she looks to steer the next phase. host: how often do you post? guest: usually twice, three times a week, sometimes more. i have a lot of flexibility. i have a great editor who worked with me sometimes. we go back and forth. it is pretty good. they generally have asked me -- i do not have to deal with commodity news unless it is a huge breaking story. the idea that they want me to get scoops and unique angles. that can be at times a real challenge but it is also a very rewarding approached. host: here is arlington on are democrats' line. caller: hello. i believe in all honesty. i am a democrat. the four people killed is hurting the bed and is disgraceful as a democrat. i see no end to this in washington. maybe there is no come back from it. i want to know what yo
on this side? >> first of all i'd like to thank chairman mica and ranking members brown and cummings for holding this hearing today which focuses on it's noted that amtrak has a record of 30.2 million passengers. traveling on amtrak and full year 2011. we would have seen head lines like amtrak has record of low ridership. instead amtrak's ridership is booming this year with 11 consecutive monthly rider ship records. in each month of this fiscal year, amtrak has posted the highest total ever for that particular month with the final month of september also expected to be a new record. >> a 25% cut in funding and even more alarming not having a vision for high-speed rail network. these actions are detrimental to the transportation opportunities for all americans. the alternative to build more roads by more cars and consume more oil should not be our only solution. in fact, according to d.o.t., in comparison, in 1958 through 2012, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit, and yet amtrak, which was created in
to have an electric car or natural gas-powered car and you see what happens. senator brown alexander has been a real leader in this and he even has an electric car. he is going the distance here, walking the walk. that's the kind of thing government can do. government can do a lot on the regulatory side to slow things down if you forget to have effective cost-benefit analysis, but it can do a lot on the project side to really find something that works and the community becomes the laboratory for change and that others can then model. you do not have to do it everywhere and if you can show in water to a location that there really work. that is the driving force behind the idea of that lamar has been a significant spokesperson for. >> do like that car? >> i do like it. i have driven my leaf. for a lit -- for a year-and-a- half. i live in this building in a plug in the wall when i go home at night. that's all i have to do. deployment communities are a good idea. sometimes the government can have a demonstration project that makes a difference. they did a hydraulic factory and we have had fr
and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of thing. the idea of actually depicting presidents t idea of doing that is you can't take it seriously, that kind of thing. so the idea that peter morgan who is a well respected writer but hadn't found his voice up to that point. it wasn't until he wrote "the deal" he found his groove. having him on board and having proper producers behind it gave it a seriousness and a weight that nothing had had before that was looking at these sort of people. so "the deal" was on tv. i was offered the part and no one knew what to expect. everyone expected it to fail and not work. and i think through a combination of factors, the tone was right and it was acceptable and suddenly once the tone was acceptable and people were tible accept watching a drama which includes tony blair in bed. snons you take that seriously it opens an entire new unive
giving you the sense of so think of lumber are browned the world and being a book whose dome maxima and profitability while minimizing the price of a u.s. selling. apple has a huge margin. we have the understanding of slavery. how do we attack it based on this economic profile? understanding the shift, it. as to certain kinds of tactics and policies that might prove more effective. making it less profitable, awarding to be evolves in the process of child labor etc.. understanding claim supply chains. they are coming from over there. the baby tainted that certain points. leveraged demand as consumers as a wearing demand involved in global supply chains so we can make choices to products the untainted by various -- it would want to use the market forces. i mention supply chains. this is it getting more and more attention of the to of the antislavery community. all of the things we buy and consume every day. i have traced and documented money things we buy here today. here is a list of some of those. it is an important to note they are not one time events. they fitted a cycle of all vu
there by four or five -- he described them -- as brown, burley, a greek sailors. when they took their meals during those storms come they would sit on the floor with bottles of champagne between their knees. this 88, 90-year-old man -- well, not 90, but in his late a.d.'s. he lived a very rich life. and of course, the second premier ship in the early 1950's. i think lady stones -- lady soames is correct and she knows her father. the last years were a slow descent. diana, the daughter, died of an overdose of barbiturates. he did not quite get it. 64'88, '89, the christmas of -- they brought in fresh oysters and champagne. his private secretary was their. his children. christmas dinner lasted well and stu the 20 -- into the 26, and i think it was january 29 winter chill refused his brandy and cigars after dinner for the first time ever. he went into a coma and his doctor -- both doctors said, it is a question now it is going to be a day? and it was a question of two weeks. they did not know how strong he was at the very end. >> you mentioned his private secretary jack cole will, and you menti
their attention to some of these key states. >> what did you learn today? >> that jerry brown will run for reelection. he is one of three governors who has ever served as both the young as governor of their state and the oldest. he is not going anywhere. if he is an office, maybe we will see a clinton/brown rematch. >> the democrats are not so optimistic about new jersey. they are optimistic about virginia. sandy seemed to be pretty good thing for chris christie. >> the attorney general who typically in virginia waits his turn and then ms. of tulips and the governor has decided to run for governor. -- and then goes up for governor has decided to run. he is not happy about this. he is thinking about running as an independent. that would all but guaranteed the former democratic national committee chairman of the governor of virginia. if you had some of the five years ago i would probably have called you nouts. >> wisconsin, scott walker is coming out of the successful recall. he has talked about as a very high presidential hopeful for 2016. president obama have a pretty sizable victory i
they had represented the brown on and a tape of him as saying the world is only 9000 years old going off the literal translation. people like that generally lack the ability to look at complex issues and try to simplify it. had the same time -- at the same time, the one to seem like they are preaching to us about the bible and abortion are the ones who seemingly lack the ability to live the way christ told them they are supposed to live. they gave to the rich. they let the thursday turn to dust and the sick by. host: here are some more pew research numbers. differing views on the impact of religion's influence on society. is religion increasing or losing its influence on american life? is it a good thing or bad thing? 25% said religion is increasing its influence while 66% said it is losing its influence. of those numbers, 49% said it was a bad thing, 12% said it was a good thing. views of religious institutions. this is the percentage of people will agree that churches and other religious organizations are too involved in politics. the general public says 46% agreed. but unofficially at
. king: i rise in support of s. 1998, the dart act, introduced by senator scott brown of massachusetts. this will improve financial accountability and management at the department of homeland security. since the department opened its doors on march 1, 2003, financial management of all 22 emerged agencies has been one of the most significant challenges. fiscal year 2012, over nine years since d.h.s. was created, was the first time the department was able to complete a financial audit and received a qualified opinion on all five financial statements covering the entire department. unfortunately d.h.s. has been unable to get an unqualified or clean opinion stating that there are no material weaknesses in its financial systems. until such time there is confidence in the d.h.s. financial structure, questions will remain on how d.h.s. accounting -- on how d.h.s. accounts for taxpayer money. this important legislation is needed but will require the department to create a plan to meet the requirements to reach an unqualified opinion. specifically, the bill requires the secretary of state to ta
pounds of thermal protection. it would last forever. it just turns brown and does not char. >> thank you for being such a rock star engineer. i really look up to that. you have spoken this whole evening about inspiration and the fact that everyone that you look up to was inspired at some time. i wonder if you have your own branch whose sole purpose is to inspire youth? >> you know, i am very familiar. i was judged at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson's program, he tells everyone about it. in almost ev
knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great honor and privilege to turn the floor over to the professors. we will just go in that order is that will be ok. bill, we will start with you. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, ambassador huntsman, for the introduction and for your superb service to our nation in beijing. i would like to say john thornton, cheng li and jerome cohen for this series. for bringing he weifang to the broader international audience, you are enriching the knowledge of china. thank you very much. it is fitting that he weifang should be the first person from the world of law in this series. he is somebody of incredible courage, which, incisiveness, and preach against -- prescience. i cherished member -- memories from harvard where we had a
car or natural gas-powered car and you see what happens. senator brown alexander has been a real leader in this and he even has an electric car. he is going the distance here, walking the walk. that's the kind of thing government can do. government can do a lot on the regulatory side to slow things down if you forget to have effective cost-benefit analysis, but it can do a lot on the project side to really find something that works and the community becomes the laboratory for change and that others can then model. you do not have to do it everywhere and if you can show in water to a location that there really work. that is the driving force behind the idea of that lamar has been a significant spokesperson for. >> do like that car? >> i do like it. i have driven my leaf. i live in this building in a plug in the wall when i go home at night. that's all i have to do. deployment communities are a good idea. sometimes the government can have a demonstration project that makes a difference. they did a hydraulic factory and we have had fracking are around forever. three things made a di
domino going on with susan arise. it is leading possibly to kerry or scott brown, your man in massachusetts that lost. you know, if i were president obama, i would look to play this game of chess differently. i do not know if i would look to an joe lieberman or somebody completely unexpected. i would keep john kerry out of it and i would play the political game of chess that is being forced imam the president. i would like to say -- i agree with the former callers and really the woman from florida talking about how we should not be rigid we should be making decisions about what is best for america. i would like to finish and say this deficit and debt is all about health care costs. mostly the costs are humongous. they are not micromanaging and looking at health care costs and ways to bring down health-care costs. i believe including opening up medicare to younker buyers, people that can buy and, who never use my health care costing $6,000 a fourier and i have not used it for 20 years. host: thank you for the call. this from "to the new york times. are [video clip] >> susan
in massachusetts. he ran against scott brown and loss. congressman stephen lynch. name out of contention is ted kennedy, jr. he will not seek the seat. he was speculated to seek the seat of his late father. the decision to buck the dying inouye. senator daniel in a the swearing-in took place yesterday with joe biden. brian schatz becomes the senior senator with the new congress being formed on january the third. on the independent line -- jack on the independent line. caller: good morning. i bet a co-worker that we are going over the fiscal cliff. it is more of a slope than a cliff. it would be a year of complete in activity before we would see the real bite of everything, all of the doom that is being forecasted. i am reminded of erskine bowles and alan simpson. about three weeks ago or four weeks ago, they met with the president and members of congress and discuss their feelings afterwards with the press. erskine bowles said he felt there was a third of a chance that there would be a deal and a third of a chance no deal and a third there would be no deal until after we went past the january 1
joined by the former government chief when the labour party was in office nick browne. the member of parliament. it's great to have you here. thank you for coming. to oppose the motion, i call from the east of england. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. we are here for one reason. to make contain and empower the young people that we so proudly represent. but, -- the parliament campaign for the next year to be made public transport better, and acceptable for both. we are not giving the young people that we have -- [inaudible] the justice they deserve. [inaudible] have been the campaign for the last year. we have not achieved the goal of making transport cheaper, better, and exceptional. so this year, let's pay that is more assessable to be reached. which one question impact instead of continually -- [inaudible] our campaign year after year. we are here to make contain -- [inaudible] campaign that is not reachable. in apartmentment we are protect our youth services and civilities. we continue to see -- [inaudible] local governments and local consulates to keep these facilities. s
to the corridor and the connections that we have. a question was raced by ms. brown about impeding some of the service along the way. actually if it's properly done and there is separation, we can enhance local passenger service commuter service and we can also increase freight traffic by again separation within the corridor with the right plan. so i look forward to working with you mr. boardman, with the deputy administrator and others. and thank you for participating today. we're going to leave the record open till the 31st of december. how is that for a date, without objection. and we'll have additional questions we'll submit to you. may i yield to ms. norton. >> that's a fine date. we'll either be over the cliff or not by that time. i appreciate this hearing. i want to say i have an a supporter of private projects in my own subcommittee on economic development where it's better known and better understood and extensively used. i have -- and therefore, i'm very interested in its conceivable application to a railroad. if we did more public private partnerships in construction and real
and worked at a plant that made industrial magnets. he later attended brown university which is something we have in common and played rugby well according to some of my rugby-playing friends and met his wife there. he is a lawyer by trade with a law degree from notre dame and started out in the general counsel's office in 1993 which then merged with bank of america in 2004 and was eventually elevated to general council in 2008. when bank of america bought merrill lynch as it was teetering on the edge of the financial crisis he was named c.e.o. of the investment firm then c.e.o. of the bank. so brian became c.e.o. at a time we all agree was a tumultuous time in the banking industry. under his leadership the bank has focused on reducing non- core business assets as well as its mortgage surfacing portfolio. "fortune" magazine wrote of brian reveals that he has proven his mettle as team builder and crisis manager and perhaps uniquely suited for the job of chief executive in the banking world. the business is now so complicated and so fraught with hidden dangers lodged in esso take that leaders
walker will welcome you as well. ed reilly will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. joan walker is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher on the poll. we have interviewed 25,000 americans. we have a very rich body of knowledge about specific issues, and now coming togethe
it takes. i have not gone over losing the browns to baltimore. 40 years might do it. now go tto we now kno mr. quiqley. >> i appreciate your having this hearing. those watching this know the house has a history of hearings about performance enhancing drugs in sports. some of them famous, some of them intimist. what struck me in looking at this meeting was that he used to be major league baseball was behind. now it is the only major sport testing for hgh . if the mlb can agree, it makes no sense to me that the nfl can't as well. i want to go in the weeds a little bit, but when you take hgh is in a sequence. you are on it for a while and in your office for a while. i would like a little nuance what that means as to why one is preferred given there is a gap. >> well, there is not a preference for one versus the other. they are complementary. when we get them validated, we will use both of them. a good example was we had the bile markers test used at the games in london this summer. two athletes tested positive by the buyer markers test and did not test positive by the other test. the reason w
that it would create a special law election in massachusetts. they would like to see scott brown when that special election and come right back. i think you are going to see a lot of -- i think you are going to see a lot of pull for john kerry in congress. then the dominoes start to fall. what about that massachusetts seat and members of congress running? people with the ability to raise a lot of money, with a lot of name recognition in that state? the kennedys, who also lived in massachusetts? it will be very interesting to see those political documents falling after his name. host: stephen, thank you so much. we have been talking this morning about the shooting on friday in connecticut. president obama will be headed to new town this evening. he will be attending a memorial service and he will speak at an interfaith vigil for the families and the victims. he will be meeting with the families and he will be thanking the first responders. all of that this evening on c- span. we will be right here. something else that we are doing right now this holiday season is looking at the chaplai
week, it was lucy and charlie brown. we did the same thing in the last that sivan agreement. -- debt ceiling agreement. that is something we will be pushing to do in the context of this debate, but also in the context of what i hope will be a debt ceiling debate that takes place in february and march of next year. >> let me follow the question with a related one. it is one thing to stand up to the president. when we look at the way government spending, as a percentage of gdp has risen more under republicans and democrats, how can we do with that a little bit better? >> we have done this the last three years of the republican study committee. we actually put out an alternative budget. we believe by putting out a budget that shows a path to balance in a reasonable time -- our last one balanced in 5.5 years, according to the cbo. the budget we passed -- that gives us a better chance to market that. i think that is part of the vision, how this is going to help your family, your community, if we get to balance what that means for opportunity, for growth. >> it is an important point. i cam
are one family in this great country of ours. we are black and white, we are brown, we are republicans and democrats. we are conservatives and liberals. we are gays and straights. we are from every part of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the proc
and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from florida is recognized. ms. brown: thank you, mr. speaker. social security has nothing to do with the debt problems that we're facing now. the seniors and disabled should not be held hostage by the republicans. their only priority in this debate is to protect american's wealthiest citizens. under former president bush, our nation financed two wars on the credit card and senior citizens should not be collateral damage. we lost trillions of dollars through irresponsible tax cuts and let's be clear, tax cuts are the same as spending when it comes to the deficit. and now the republican party's proposed solution is to make up the difference from taking money from seniors. that is unacceptable. i am from florida, home of mr. pepper and if he were here he would be furious that a program developed to keep seniors out of poverty has been jeopardized by tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas ris
this gentleman 10 minutes to answer the question. my analogy is that charlie brown, president obama, the fiscal cliff football is always being yanked out from him by the nasty republicans in the house and senate. is it not time for you to let the american people have a touchdown? where is the jobs bill? you keep talking about jobs. i have not heard -- i watched the news all the time and i have nine republicans present any jobs bill. host: beverly, we've got a lot on the table. we will get an answer from representative huelscamp. guest: thanks for your question. it is illegal to say merry christmas in congress, but i will say so anyway. most americans, and particularly in kansas, the football,,lucy holds is usually spending cuts. i'm afraid we will take a swing at the fiscal cliff and we will not make any spending cuts. if we have a spending problem in washington and not a revenue problem. republicans will be asked to talk about revenue. at the end of the day, unless we get our spending under control, we will never get our deposition under control and we are never going to get our debt under con
this gentleman 10 minutes to answer that. but that's the question. my analogy is the charlie brown , president obama, the fiscal cliff, football, is always being yavepingd out from him from the nancy republicans in both the house and the senate. and isn't it time to let the football, the american people, get a little -- get a touchdown? let's have a touchdown. where is the job bill? you keep talking about jobs. where are -- i haven't heard -- i watch the news all the time, and i haven't heard republicans prevent any jobs bill. host: and beverly, we got a lot on the table there. we'll get an answer from representative huelskamp. beverly is a -- guest: it's illegal to say merry christmas in congress. i will take that -- the football that lucy holds is usually spending cuts. i'm afraid we are going to take a swing at this fiscal cliff and the football sitting there and we're not going to make any spending cuts. we have a spending problem in washington, d.c., not rieff knew problem. republican today are going to be -- we are never going to get our deficit under control. and we're going to never ge
when he came in, 60 votes in the senate, which , amount-- senator brown had won in massachusetts. but he started out with 60 and then it went down to 59 when senator kennedy and sadly died. i really admired senator kennedy as much as any man who ever served in the senate, even though we did not agree. mr. reagan had to deal with tip o'neill. that was one of the great events in washington politics because you had two extraordinarily capable politician opposing points of view. mr. reagan was poorly matched. mr. obama had nancy pelosi as speaker of the house. but hardly the same thing. host: from massachusetts on the line, democrat. caller: good morning. i have a comment and question. i am trying to find out, the situation you're in right now, why is everybody fighting about what we should do? i am gmt and i am broke every day. i'm down here with people that paid taxes and work hard every day. -- i am an emt. people don't understand that would ever happens with the fiscal cliff, people down here will survive. the republicans, this will definitely affect them in the future. i talked
and john brown. during the 1994 health reform debate to reach the political divide. after he passed away, we thought it was imperative that we revive the coalition to help the bipartisanship following the divisiveness of the senate impeachment trial. following the landmark supreme court ruling in bush vs. gore that adjudicated the presidential election and evenly split senate with 50 republicans and 50 democrats, senate leaders joined with nearly one- third of the senate at a meeting of the centrist coalition to explore how to move forward in a bipartisan fashion. it is precisely this kind of approach that is crucial, madam president. it is only when we minimize the political barriers that we can maximize the senate allowing it to become an unparalleled incubator for results that truly matter to the american people. it was a cross aisle alliance that produced the program that was a rewrite of the telecommunications act for the first time. this was a landmark law insuring every library in classroom in america would be wired to the revolutionary resources of the internet which one publicat
brown and does not char. >> thank you for being such a rock star engineer. i really look up to that. you have spoken this whole evening about inspiration and the fact that everyone that you look up to was inspired at some time. i wonder if you have your own branch whose sole purpose is to inspire youth? >> you know, i am very familiar. i was judged at the first u.s. first competition. i was invited to be a judge and the competition was just too high schools in manchester the first year. so i am very familiar and supportive of that. i gave a talk at a brand new charter school in my home town where they are starting off kids with robotics between the ages of 6 and 13. boy, are they excited to go to school. let's see. the big problem that we had that we never could even do a student summer co-op program -- the problem is, our company was so small that it was hard for us to build barriers from one project to another. everyone of them essentially is nonpublic. richard branson's program, he tells everyone about it. in almost every other program, they don't want to leave that information. if yo
promise to cut spending in the future. last week, it was lucy and charlie brown. we did the same thing in the last that sivan agreement. that is something we will be pushing to do in the context of this debate, but also in the context of what i hope will be a debt ceiling debate that takes place in february and march of next year. >> let me follow the question with a related one. it is one thing to stand up to the president. when we look at the way government spending, as a percentage of gdp has risen more under republicans and democrats, how can we do with that a little bit better? >> we have done this the last three years of the republican study committee. we actually put out an alternative budget. we believe by putting out a budget that shows a path to balance in a reasonable time -- our last one balanced in 5.5 years, according to the cbo. the budget the past -- that gives us a better chance to market that. i think that is part of the vision, how this is going to help your family, your community, if we get to balance what that means for opportunity, for growth. >> it is an importan
from bull's best said. polls-simpson said brown the base, lower the rates. we now have the president's proposing raising the rates and opposing a base-broadening measure. republicans want to keep the rate same and run the base, but that is different. bowles-simpson had it right. i look at the logic of the white house with regard to the idea of capping a itemized deductions. i would like to take a look at it from a cost-benefit point of view. we're looking at tax expenditures, and we should benefits inst of doing it. they're against it for two reasons, the first one was effected some taxpayers making less than 2 hen $50,000, which is true. this would be a $50,000 cap, said the people we're talking about are people who are using way above average levels of itemized deductions at that level. when -- to the analysis using the tabulated data, i get about 1.2 million taxpayers with incomes under $250,000 over the $50,000 cap. according to the white house, they are proposing to get around that by a method that costs $200 billion over the 10 years. if you apportion that to protect these 1.2
was first up, but it looks like it might be texas. excuse me. florida. ms. brown: i'm from florida, and i'm from the home of claude pep per, and he was a -- pepper, and he was mr. social security. and he was here during the time of ronald reagan and he plead sure that social security, which was enacted under the democrats, and i will never forget newt gingrich said he wanted it to wither on the vine. that's been their philosophy. now, i feel that medicaid, medicare and social security is the difference between us and many of the thirled-world countries. in fact, it has been the bedrock of american politics as far as helping to raise the standards. and you know, many of my colleagues often talk about the bible. well, the bible says -- i never heard them say let's help the rich. the bible always talks about the poor and what we need to do to help raise the standards. that's what we're supposed to be doing in the people's house. during the campaign, they constantly confused the american people, talking about the $715 billion that was in both proposals that was savings that we put back into t
. a couple main thoughts on this. brown had a very interesting article, the title was just because mohammed morsi is paranoid doesn't mean he doesn't have real enemies. so yes the brotherhood is very paranoid. but there were certain elements of the deep state primarily the judiciary that were out to really damage the brotherhood's standing in society. and there is evidence for that and that is what already happened the dissolution of parliament. and i think that to me was one of the worst moments and one of the most dangerous of the transition because it fed into the brotherhood's narrative that the world will not let them win in elections and govern. the memory of aljeera shapes everything that they do. and we can disagree whether or not these fears are legitimate. but that's the way they see the world around them. my hope is that if they feel more secure, if some of those threats can be removed the judiciary plays a less politicized role, a more independent role then maybe they'll be able to take a step back. i don't know. we'll have to wait and see. but i think that would be the hope. no
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